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Crochet fabric yarn basket

Peach and Purple

But actually, neat and sturdy stitches aren’t limited to Baskets for Guys. I had fun making these for the lovely young ladies, splurging in peachy orange, sparkly purple and pink-striped trim. I’m sounding bold but all along there was that nagging hesitation too – will the baskets fit the color scheme of their destined surroundings? Will they suit the receivers’ individual tastes, which I so admire and respect?
But if we went along with thoughts like that, there’d be no give and take, would there, to use Eeyore’s terms. And thinking of that, weren’t Pooh and Piglet a little hesitant about their own gifts too, and wasn’t Eeyore so very pleased to get them nonetheless?
And does a flower ask itself every day if its colors are just right, and if its petals are facing the exact right direction?

Bird of Paradise
So, I guess all we can do is pick up our magic wand and crochet that pumpkin – or lilac – and send them on their way!

Crochet Fabric Yarn BasketBird of ParadiseCrochet Fabric Yarn BasketCrochet Fabric Yarn Basket

The baskets are posing here with a little something in them, and in real life, there were other little somethings inside.
No problem with ribbons this time!

Crochet Fabric Yarn Basket

How I made the baskets:
Using a size 12 hook and fabric yarn, I made a round spiral base in SC. I worked the sides in yarn under single crochet, working into the back loops only of the base. I made the trim in crab stitch, or reverse single crochet. I left a tail at the beginning and end of the trim, and used it to tie the bow. That’s it!

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Crochet Fabric Yarn Baskets

The Gift of Baskets

In our family, guys get baskets too. I’ll have to say they were sweet about it, though! And I for my part did my best to meet the design challenge: I made a round base and finished it off, then started working the sides into the back loops of the last row of the base. Both the base and the sides were done using yarn under single crochet. What is that, you ask? Oh! (Shrugging nonchalantly…), only the coolest and most useful stitch that I’ve just recently discovered… It’s a good stitch for when you want a neat and sturdy style.  Did I mention I was making these for the guys? Crochet Fabric Yarn BasketCrochet Fabric Yarn Basket The trim was made with a complementary color, in good old-fashioned single crochet.  No ribbons and bows this time… Crochet Fabric Yarn BasketCrochet Fabric Yarn Basket The fruit is for the picture. In reality there were other things inside, and the guys, being sweet, pretended along with me that they didn’t know whatever was in them, no matter how carefully chosen and well meant, was just an excuse to give them one of my very own creations 🙂 Crochet Fabric Yarn Baskets

Crochet Fabric Yarn Basket

Spring Basket

It’s still spring in Basketland – Look what sprouted in my garden!Crochet Fabric Yarn Basket

After more spiral-crochet baskets than I can count, occupying a total area which far exceeds the sum total of surface areas in my house AND all my friends’ and relatives’ houses combined, I’ve decided it’s time to switch to… A new type of basket! My research on more sturdy sides, allowing for a slightly less roundish and more cylindrical shape, led me to the waistcoat stitch. The stitch, despite its anything-but-botanical name, actually yields a lush leaf-like texture, which totally looks like something growing from the spiral base . And so it is fitting that it should have a daisy-ish trim. I made the trim with a combination of single crochet (the white) and slip stitch (the yellow).crochet fabric yarn basket

And of course, the bow.Crochet Fabric Yarn Basket

Crochet Fabric Yarn Nesting Baskets

Baby Nesting Baskets

I chose this design for a cute little round basket with a single handle. I bought lots of balls of fabric yarn in bright colors to choose from. And while I was experimenting with the design, some came out a little bigger and some a little smaller, depending on which type of strand I used. Where I buy fabric yarn, the strands are each different, because they are made from textile factory leftovers.  I think that counts as a certain level of recycling!
Anyway, I noticed that the smaller ones fit very nicely into the bigger ones – and I had fun mixing and matching them into these duos.
Two lone but determined wildflowers springing up from the lawn were in full agreement with the little baskets: It’s definitely spring.

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fabric yarn basket

Blue Basket With Flowers and Trim

Since my first two little baskets, I have crocheted so many baskets with fabric yarn, and un-crocheted even more!  Wait, that doesn’t make sense… But that’s how it seems.  Fabric yarn is so quick and easy to unravel, that whenever I don’t like the outcome I just pull and undo it, and remake it a little better… Or maybe change the type and color of the trim.
But if I get past the immediate urge to unravel the imperfect, or if by chance it comes out perfect, I place the finished basket somewhere ‘just for now’, and something strange begins to happen… The fabric yarn I just finished crocheting sends off little rootlets into the table or the shelf… The roots grow into the surface, deepening their hold (they do this especially at night), and when I want to move the basket, I discover it’s too late, it’s impossible to detach it from where it has been standing.
There is only one way to get around this (that I know of), and that is, when you crochet the basket for someone special. There will be a lot of unraveling and redoing, but when it’s finished, the roots will wait to grow until they reach that person’s house.
So now, it’s just a matter of finding the right flowers to go with the basket.2014-2-canon 167
I have had two opportunities to make such a basket for two special someones, and it was such a nice feeling to see them growing roots in their new home. Well, I didn’t try to lift them from their place but I assume it’s the same on any surface.
IMG_20140802_172537095This picture was taken by my niece N. (we were running a little low on daylight, but I think the lighting gives it atmosphere…).

These two baskets (they are two different ones, although they look the same…) were made by single-crocheting blue fabric yarn in a spiral for the base, then continuing straight on for the sides. Once you have a low-rimmed blue bowl, you finish it off, and start to crochet the flower rows. My green and red strands were slightly thinner than the blue, so I think I may have used a slightly smaller hook. This serves well for the rounding in of the basket. You start with the stems in green: Two half double-crochets in a stitch, then skip one (you need to have an even number of stitches, which you will if you start the base with an even number of single crochets into the magic circle). For the next row, you crochet a red half double crochet into a pair of green hdc’s, right between the stems – then chain stitch, and so on all around. For the trim, you use a lacy strand of fabric yarn. You start by slip-stitching the strand to the space between two red hdc’s, then chain-stitching (I think 4 ch st), and slip-stitching again in the next space, and so on all around.
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If you start with a tail to the thread and end with one, you can pull those tails through to the outside of the basket to make a bow, or just tie in a loose knot and let the strands hang down so their laciness shows.
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If you put a flowerpot in the basket, be sure to use a base for it, and if you want cut flowers or a little flower arrangement, make sure it’s in a bowl!

fabric yarn basket

Chunky Gray Basket With Trim

I had this broad-band gray knit strand.
It wasn’t quite as soft and cottony as t-shirt yarn, so I thought this was a good chance to make a biggish and firm rug. Or basket. Or rug. I started single-crocheting around in a spiral with my no. 15 hook, stretching out the loops at the end of each stitch to make sure it didn’t round in and I could postpone the decision of whether it would be a rug or a basket until… That was it, and it was time to go up now – or forever be flat on the ground. I went up, and crocheted around the edges until the fab-yarn* ran out. Luckily the sides were just tall enough to keep a something in the basket.
2014-2-canon 224 1 edI then pulled out the pink strand with black polka dots. It was just right for the trim, which I made in the reverse single crochet stitch (rsc). There was enough left for a cute bow tie. I know it’s a little too much but I couldn’t resist it… Pink polka dotted yarn has a certain effect on me.
2014-2-canon 239 1 edBy now I’d decided the something in the basket would be pomegranates.
I started with two beautiful ceramic pomegranates (made by Ayelet, like all the beautiful ceramic art in my photos). One of the pomegranates has a dusty pink shade that reflected the pink strand nicely.
2014-2-canon 224 edPomegranates are in season here and they are a symbolic fruit for the coming Jewish New Year, too.
The two ceramic treasures were joined by some real ones.
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Can you tell them apart?

2014-2-canon 242 1 edIf only the new year could be as sweet as pomegranates!
Just a thought: Have you ever considered the fact that seeding a pomegranate has much the same appeal as crocheting? As the little chunks of bright color gather at your fingertips, they make you want to keep at this pleasant task by sending some secret signal to our hunter-gatherer brain that says, “keep gathering those little berries… Roots… Seeds… Soon your family will be fed and you will be happy.”
The pomegranates are delicious (the edible ones). 2014-2-canon 244 1 ed

*Fab-yarn is a term I invented, it’s short for fabric yarn, and if it hasn’t been invented before, I get cheers and claps – but only if it catches. I’ll Google it in a few weeks (or years?) and we’ll see if it’s out there!

pink and blue fabric baskets

Little Pink and Blue Baskets

This was my first finished project in fabric yarn. I had started a rug from recycled shirts, but I ran out of old clothes to recycle and had to go buy some ready-made fabric yarn. The thread was soft and high in cotton fiber, the colors were delightful, and I was on my way to a double-birthday coffee meetup… So I decided to make two little baskets to give my two friends. I knew how to crochet from ages and ages ago, so I thought – okay, same thing, just a bigger hook and thicker thread. Almost…
I used a 9-10 hook.
I made a magic ring, then single crocheted into it and started going around in a spiral. For the blue basket, I crocheted inside the stitches (the usual way), and for the pink basket, I crocheted into the back of the loop. I increased intuitively, creating a small flat base (usually, increases for double crochet are about 6 per row). When the base was big enough (about 15 cm, I think) I stopped increasing and just crocheted around till the basket was tall enough (about 6-7 cm). I closed the spiral by crocheting the last couple of stiches a little more tightly, and then made one or two slip stitches – to gradually decrease the height of that last row and close it off. The last stitch was an invisible join.

I discovered the special thing about fabric yarn: If it’s made from jersey – t-shirt fabric or the likes, it has that bit of a stretch, which makes it tighten a little at the top. In other words, it wants to be a little round basket. It keeps rounding itself as you crochet, even if by sheer math you have the right amount of stiches to create a flat base or straight-up row.
Perfect for the job!

Still, when I got to the top, I slip-stiched a trim, and decreased a couple of stiches to make it close in a little more. For the blue basket, I used the right side of the work for the outside, the “normal”‘ way. For the pink basket, I turned it inside out and used the backside for the outside – that’s because crocheting in the back loops made the spiral too visible for my liking.  But the back side was cute, it looked round and pearly.

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I had the ends of the trim thread left, and so instead of weaving them in and cutting, I used them to tie a small bow for embellishment. The ribbon conveniently hid the end point of the spiral, which despite my camouflage efforts, did show a tiny jump in height.

The hook was okay for the thread, but created a pretty tight “fabric”. If the thread had been any thicker, I would have needed a bigger hook. But the tight texture of the finished fabric was so cool, it made the basket pretty sturdy, and yet it had the softness and flexibility of the cotton knit it was made from. It made me think of a traditional straw basket – and I think that’s part of the appeal of fabric crochet.

And the reason I became immediately hooked!

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(Oh, I was running late to the coffee meetup, so I just grabbed the camera and snapped this in pretty dusky lighting… I hope my next photos will be better).

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